Books you have read lately?

For pretty much anything else.
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just finished "When Things Fall Apart" by Pema Chödrön https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pema_Ch%C3%B6dr%C3%B6n

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More and more I'm realizing that there's just not a lot of time to read. I find there's a lot of material out there. I do want to read the good stuff, but it's not easy to choose what makes the cut. Previously, my criteria was rather conservative: focus entirely on classics when it comes to novels and expand to trusted role models when it comes to business/self-improvement books.

When Things Fall Apart is layman's introduction to traditional bodhisattva, the buddhist term for the mindful intention to achieve nirvana. Something like that. There's a lot of vocabulary in the book, but it all boils down to the same stuff about accepting the good and the bad together & appreciating existence.

I've read about buddhism here and there and I think most of it is pretty nice, but this book kinda fell flat for me. It just got so blah blah blah blah blah by the end. What I think does stick is the idea of samsara and dukkha -- that life is basically shit so the only way to find satisfaction is to rise above its frivolous issues.

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Ray wrote:
February 11th, 2019, 9:24 pm
More and more I'm realizing that there's just not a lot of time to read.
I hear ya. There’s many times I’ve wished I could pause life of all the busy and responsibilities and just sit back and read a bunch of things. Not just read, but there’s a whole ton of other things too.

I’m thankful I have that personality that wants to do things at least. I can’t remember a time in my life I’ve ever been bored.

In the past few weeks, I've read two books: "The Martian", and "Artemis", both by Andy Weir.

If you haven't read the book or seen the movie, "The Martian" is about an astronaut who is assumed to be dead and left behind by his team on the surface of Mars. What follows is a gripping survival story. Lots of science and math and thought have gone into the book, and the character's good humor helps to keep him afloat in what would normally seem to be a hopeless situation. Highly recommend.

"Artemis" I like to sum up into two words: Moon Crimes. Taking place in the only city on the Moon perhaps less than a century or so from now, a minor-time smuggler gets involved with and tangled up in a plot to make lots of money. Of course, one fraught with danger. It's a thrilling action ride. Not quite as good as "The Martian" and a bit more predictable, especially if you read it second, but I liked it quite a bit.

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i read that as "minor time-smuggler" and thought "how are we going to have time-smugglers in less than a century??"

i liked 'the martian' the movie. good to know the book is also good (though i suppose most books with film adaptations are better than their films)

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I meant to watch The Martian, and now I have 2 more reasons to check it out.

The movie is mostly true to the book, and other than minor changes and some significant omissions for length, only changed one (I felt) major thing at the end for drama (which I felt was ridiculous, since until then the movie had been reasonably scientifically/chemically/physically feasible).

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Does anyone keep a Journal of thoughts as they read? How do you all remember everything after you read a long book or multiple books?

XcHero wrote:
March 4th, 2019, 10:11 am
Does anyone keep a Journal of thoughts as they read? How do you all remember everything after you read a long book or multiple books?
It's an interesting idea, but no, I don't. My time is so fragmented and I so frequently multitask that I just... read when I can, and go from there. It would be cool to go back and get insights or see how a character has changed. I keep a regular journal, but I rarely go back to read those. They just lay around collecting digital dust.

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XcHero wrote:
March 4th, 2019, 10:11 am
Does anyone keep a Journal of thoughts as they read? How do you all remember everything after you read a long book or multiple books?
I started doing this with self-help or self-improvement books to help me remember the contents. I keep a journal on me for day-to-day stuff too. It's helped me summarize certain passages.

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read two more. freakonomics was fun but got stale by the end. and then there were none on the other hand was an exciting mystery novel! i read it with my work book club and it was tons of fun meeting to guess what would happen next

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I read Freakonomics a few years ago, and my sis I'm fairly sure just read And Then There Were None. I believe she said she liked it. Man, I haven't read a book in ages...

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i read washington black with my company book club

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it was okay. historical fiction coming of age of a barbados slave. first half was exciting, but second half felt rushed and half-assed. this is why i try to stick to the classics!

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i made a goodreads profile

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/94962260-ray

and i read 3 more books:

american gods by neil gaiman -- hated this. the author is condescending, the plot is boring, the writing is boring, and the characters are, guess what, boring.
rise of theodore roosevelt -- 5/5 great book, couldn't put it down. how can a historical biography be more entertaining than a book about the question "what if gods walked among us"? who knows
the effective engineer -- meh. good tips to be good at work, but twice as many pages as necessary and not really that insightful


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